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The Naylor Symposium
on Undergraduate
Research
in Writing Studies

September 27–30, 2018

In its fifth year, leaders of the Naylor Workshop decided it was time to take stock of the ways that it was serving the advancement of undergraduate research in the field, and also to examine the larger picture of how undergraduate research was influencing the discipline writ large. Dominic DelliCarpini, Jane Greer, and Jenn Fishman began planning for a unique event that would invite national leaders to York College to assess the state of this high-impact practice and to help plan ways forward for the discipline. This Symposium corresponded with three key anniversaries: five years of the Naylor Workshop, ten years since the publication of George Kuh’s High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, and twenty years since the publication of the Boyer Commission’s Reinventing Undergraduate Education: A Blueprint for America's Research Universities—all of which forwarded undergraduate research as one key to higher education’s future.

The group of scholars assembled to set the goal of publishing its own report—the Naylor Report on Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies (Parlor Press, 2020). The Symposium was designed so that attendees could form working groups that would take on a key motif, each of which represented a key element for the advancement of this set of practices: mentoring, methods, contribution to knowledge, dissemination/circulation of research products, inclusion and diversity, curriculum/co-curriculum, institutional support, and impact. The workshop was designed to spur creative and innovative thinking, as Dominic DelliCarpini led the group through exercises based in Design Thinking (a.k.a. Human-Centered Design). These working groups spent three days, discussing key issues related to their own motif but also interacting regularly with other groups to find points of contact. The Symposium’s proceedings are chronicled in a chapter in the Naylor Report authored by Cindy Crimmins titled “Many Generous Hands: A Narrative Reflection on the Naylor Symposium on Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies.”

After the Symposium concluded, many of the attendees continued to work within their groups and/or individually to write chapters for the Naylor Report, which was published in 2020. The findings of the Symposium continue to influence the Naylor Workshop’s future priorities, and also help to situate the Workshop within the larger national efforts in undergraduate research in our field.  

2018 Naylor Report Cover
2018 Naylor Report Cover

ExploreSymposium Details

  • Symposium Vision

    Symposium Vision

    Naylor Symposium Brainstorming

    Vision Statement

    Naylor Symposium on Undergraduate Research in Writing
    September 27–29, 2018 • York College of Pennsylvania 

    In brief

    This watershed event calls together colleagues from all quarters of writing studies involved in steering undergraduate research in our field. Over three days, participants will work together to articulate shared priorities and goals for UR in writing. Time will be divided between plenary discussions and working groups that examine the following eight motifs: 

    • Mentoring
    • Contribution to Knowledge
    • Research Methods
    • Dissemination
    • Institutional Support
    • Curricula & Co-Curricula
    • Impact
    • Access

    All participants will be eligible to contribute to related publications. 

    In detail

    The Naylor Symposium celebrates the fifth anniversary of the Naylor Workshop for Undergraduate Research in Writing as well as the twentieth anniversary of the Boyer Commission report, Reinventing Undergraduate Education. This event calls together colleagues from all quarters of writing studies to discuss past and present praxes related to eight overarching UR motifs: mentorship, contribution to knowledge, research methods, dissemination, institutional support, curricula and co-curricula, impact, and access. Over three days, time will be divided between plenary exchanges and concurrent working groups designed to generate shared priorities and goals for the next five to twenty years of undergraduate research in writing. 

    Working groups will be led by the following scholars:  

    • Mentoring: Jessie More
    • Contribution to Knowledge: Jane Greer
    • Research Methods: Melissa Ianetta 
    • Dissemination: Trish Roberts-Miller
    • Institutional Support: Dominic DelliCarpini
    • Curricula & Co-Curricula: Bill FitzGerald
    • Impact: Jenn Fishman
    • Access: Alexis Hart

    Who should attend? 

    We welcome colleagues of all ranks and roles involved in UR in writing, including graduate students, part- and full-time faculty, and staff. We also extend a special invitation to all past participants in Naylor Workshops, including both undergraduate researchers and mentors. 

    All participants will be eligible to contribute to subsequent peer-reviewed publications related to the symposium. A formal call will be circulated in September. Contact Us

    The Naylor Symposium is organized by Dominic DelliCarpini (dcarpini@ycp.edu), Jenn Fishman (jennfishman.phd@gmail.com), and Jane Greer (greerj@umkc.edu). Contact us if you have questions or would like additional information. 

    Sponsorship

    The Naylor Symposium, like the Naylor Workshop, is made possible by the great generosity of Irvin S. Naylor. A longtime friend and benefactor of York College, Mr. Naylor is not only a successful entrepreneur but also a great sportsman and a consistent supporter of providing access to high-quality education at all levels. 

     

  • Symposium Participants

    Naylor Symposium Participants

    Naylor Symposium Brainstorming

    The scholars below gathered for this symposium, bringing together a wealth of experience and knowledge about the state of undergraduate research in our discipline and sharing ideas for how to support this work in the future. 

    Sophia Abbot, Elon University

    Heather Brook Adams, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

    Rebecca Babcock, University of Texas, Permian Basin

    Hannah Bellwoar, Juanita College

    Ljiljana Coklin, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Emily Cope, York College of Pennsylvania

    Cynthia Crimmins, York College of Pennsylvania

    Gabriel Cutrufello, York College of Pennsylvania

    Dominic DelliCarpini, York College of Pennsylvania

    Doug Downs, Montana State University

    Andrea Efthymiou, Hofstra University

    Kim Fahle Peck, York College of PA

    Heather Falconer, Curry College

    Jenn Fishman, Marquette University

    William FitzGerald, Rutgers University, Camden

    Angela  Glotfelter, Miami University of Ohio

    Jane Greer, University of Missouri, Kansas City

    Laurie Grobman, Pennsylvania State University, Berks

    Michelle Grue, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Alexis Hart, Allegheny College

    Justin Hodgson, Indiana University

    Kristine Johnson, Calvin College

    Elizabeth Kleinfeld, Metropolitan State University of Denver

    Ethna Lay, Hofstra University

    Alexandria Lockett, Spelman College

    Shurli Makmillen, Claflin University

    Mike Mattison, Wittenberg University

    Laurie McMillan, Pace University

    Jessie Moore, Elon University

    Enrique Paz, Miami University of Ohio

    Michael Rifenburg, University of North Georgia

    Trish Roberts-Miller, University of Texas, Austin

    Megan Schoettler, Miami University of Ohio

    Khirsten Scott, University of Pittsburgh

    Jenny Shanahan, Bridgewater State University

    Yvonne Teems, Hofstra University

    Lee Torda, Bridgewater State University

    Field Watts, University of Michigan

    Jennifer Wells, New College of Florida

    Mike Zerbe, York College of Pennsylvania

  • Naylor Report Contributors

    Contributors to The Naylor Report
    on Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies

    2018 Naylor Report

    The following group of scholars contributed to the Naylor Report, each providing to this study their perspectives on the growth and future of this key facet of the discipline. We are grateful for their generosity, knowledge, and service to the field.

     

    Sophia Abbot is a Graduate Apprentice in the Center for Engaged Learning and a graduate student in Elon University’s Masters of Higher Education program. Since her undergraduate participation in Students as Learners and Teachers at Bryn Mawr College, she has been active in student-faculty partnerships and partnership research. Prior to graduate school, she spent three years as an academic developer and launched and led a student-faculty pedagogic partnership initiative during that time. She serves on the International Advisory Board for the International Journal for Students as Partners and is a member of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL) Board of Directors. In her recent work, Sophia has been looking at mentorship as a form of partnership. 

    Heather Brook Adams is Assistant Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Her research investigates discourses of gender, reproduction, and shame as well as decolonial/intersectional methodologies. Adams’s work has appeared in journals such as Rhetoric Review, Women’s Studies in Communication, Peitho, and Composition Forum as well as in various edited collections. Adams has been granted funds for implementing undergraduate research while teaching at the University of Alaska Anchorage as well as at UNC-Greensboro. In her current position, she teaches courses on contemporary rhetoric, rhetorics of health and medicine, and advocacy and argumentation.

    Rebecca Day Babcock is the William and Ordelle Watts Professor at University of Texas, Permian Basin, where she teaches courses in writing and linguistics. She also serves as the Freshman English Coordinator and Director of Undergraduate Research. She has authored, co-authored, or edited several books on tutoring, writing centers, disability, and meta-research, including Researching the Writing Center, the revised edition written with Terese Thonus, and Theories and Methods of Writing Center Research, edited with Jo Mackiewicz. She has also published research in Writing Lab Newsletter, Linguistics and Education, Composition Forum, Praxis, The Peer Review, and others. She won the IWCA best article award in 2011 for her article on interpreted writing tutorials with a deaf writer, and in 2019, she received the Council of Writing Program Administrators (CWPA) Outstanding Scholarship Award for “Writing Center Directors and Diversity: A Survey,” co-authored with Sarah Banschbach Valles and Karen Keaton and published in The Peer Review.

    Hannah Bellwoar is Associate Professor of English and Director of Writing at Juniata College, where she teaches professional and digital writing. Her research interests include digital literacies, undergraduate research in writing studies, professional writing and usability studies, and the rhetoric of health and medicine. Her work has been published in Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology and Pedagogy, Harlot Journal, OneShot: A Journal of Critical Games and Play, and Technical Communication Quarterly.

    Ljiljana Coklin is a lecturer in the Writing Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is a co-director of the Civic Engagement track of the Professional Writing Minor and a coordinator of the Raab Writing Fellows Program, for which she is also a seminar leader and a mentor. 

    Emily Murphy Cope is Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Writing Studies at York College of Pennsylvania, where she directs the integrated written, oral, and visual communication program and teaches courses focused on the history of rhetoric and research methods. Her scholarship has appeared in Rhetoric Society Quarterly and several edited collections. Beginning in 2020, Emily is a co-editor of Young Scholars in Writing.

    Cynthia Crimmins, Director of the Center for Academic Innovation at York College of Pennsylvania, leads initiatives to advance high impact practices such as undergraduate research and project-based learning. From 1997–2015, she directed the Writing Center and in 2011 founded the Center for Teaching and Learning at York College. As a Teagle Assessment Scholar, she consults with colleges and universities around the country to improve student learning. At York College of Pennsylvania, Crimmins teaches first-year seminars and communication courses and mentors undergraduate researchers. 

    Gabriel Cutrufello is Chair of the Department of Communication and Writing and Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Composition in the Professional Writing program at York College of Pennsylvania, where he teaches courses in first-year composition, technical writing, document design, and research methods. His scholarship on the rhetoric of science has been published in Rhetoric Review, and his work on technical writing and writing-about-writing pedagogy has been published in Next Steps: New Directions for/in Writing about Writing, edited by Barbara Bird, Doug Downs, Moriah McCracken, and Jan Rieman (2019). 

    Dominic DelliCarpini is the Naylor Endowed Professor of Writing Studies and Dean of the Center for Community Engagement at York College of Pennsylvania. He also served as WPA for thirteen years and Chief Academic Officer for five years. His areas of research, publication, and presentation include writing and civic engagement, writing program administration, first-year writing, and writing centers as sites for undergraduate research. He is author/editor of four textbooks: The Prentice-Hall Guide for College Writers (with Stephen Reid); Composing a Life’s Work: Writing, Citizenship, and your Occupation; Issues: Readings in Academic Disciplines; and Conversations: Readings for Writing (with Jack Selzer).

    Doug Downs is Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Montana State University, founder of its writing major, and Director of its Core Writing Program, 2013–18. He served as editor of Young Scholars in Writing, the national journal of undergraduate research in rhetoric and writing studies, from 2015–2019. Downs researches conceptions of writing, student reading, and writing pedagogy. With Elizabeth Wardle, he is coauthor of the textbook Writing about Writing and a foundational 2007 College Composition and Communication article on writing about writing. He is a co-editor of Next Steps: New Directions for / in Writing about Writing (2019) and has published numerous chapters and articles on first-year composition, writing pedagogy, student reading practices, and the disciplinarity of Writing Studies.

    Andrea Rosso Efthymiou is Assistant Professor of Writing Studies and Rhetoric and Writing Center Director at Hofstra University. Andrea’s work on institutional mission in writing program administration and tutors’ discursive practices has appeared in various edited collections. Andrea’s research interests include sustainable mentorship of undergraduate research through tutor education and facilitating undergraduate students’ civic engagement. She is currently developing a longitudinal assessment plan to measure the impact of writing center tutors’ extended work beyond sessions, looking specifically at tutors’ writing center research, conference presentations, and publications as artifacts of undergraduate research.

    Heather Falconer is Assistant Professor of Writing at Curry College and Coordinator of the Reading/Writing Enrichment program. She serves as an editor with the Perspectives on Writing book series (The WAC Clearinghouse), as well as Chair of the Research and Publications Committee for the Association for Writing Across the Curriculum. Dr. Falconer's research has appeared in Written Communication, The WAC Journal, the Journal for Research in Science Teaching, and the Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, as well as numerous edited collections. 

    Jenn Fishman is Associate Professor of rhetoric and composition/writing studies and a writing administrator at Marquette University. The author of more than a dozen articles and book chapters, she has edited the Research Exchange Index and issues of CCC Online, Peitho, and Community Literacy Journal. Her grant- and award-winning research centers on longitudinal projects from the Stanford Study of Writing to Kenyon Writes. Past President of the Coalition of Feminist Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition, her national professional leadership includes stewardship of undergraduate research on behalf of the Conference on College Composition and Communication and the Rhetoric Society of America.

    William FitzGerald is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University-Camden, where he directs the Writing Program and the Teaching Matters and Assessment Center. He is the author, among other publications, of Spiritual Modalities: Prayer as Rhetoric and Performance (Penn State Press) and co-author/co-editor with Joseph Bizup of reference guides for the University of Chicago Press, including The Craft of Research, 4e; A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 7e; and The Student's Guide to Writing College Papers, 5e. 

    Jane Greer, University of Missouri Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor, is the editor of Girls and Literacy in America: Historical Perspectives to the Present (ABC-Clio, 2003) and, with Laurie Grobman, coeditor of Pedagogies of Public Memory: Teaching Writing and Rhetoric at Museums, Archives, and Memorials (Routledge 2015). From 2010 to 2015, she served as editor of Young Scholars in Writing, and her scholarship has appeared in College English, College Composition and Communication, Peitho, WPA Journal, and numerous edited collections. A professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Missouri, Kansas City (UMKC), she teaches composition courses as well as classes on the rhetorical practices of girls and women. She also serves as UMKC’s Director of Undergraduate Research.

    Laurie Grobman, Professor of English and women’s studies at Penn State Berks, has published two single-authored books and four coedited collections, including Pedagogies of Public Memory: Teaching Writing and Rhetoric at Museums, Archives, and Memorials (Routledge, 2015, with Jane Greer) and Undergraduate Research in English Studies (NCTE, 2010, with Joyce Kinkead). Grobman's article, “‘Engaging Race’: Critical Race Inquiry and Community-Engaged Scholarship,” received the 2018 NCTE Richard C. Ohmann Outstanding Article in College English Award. She was the 2014 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Outstanding Baccalaureate Colleges Professor of the Year. Grobman's most recent book, coauthored with Dr. E. Michele Ramsey, is Major Decisions: College, Career, and the Case for the Humanities, and is forthcoming from the University of Pennsylvania Press. With her late colleague and friend, Candace Spigelman, Grobman co-founded Young Scholars in Writing: Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric in 2003. She edited the journal through 2009.

    Alexis Hart, Director of Writing at Allegheny College, is the editor of How to Start an Undergraduate Research Journal (CUR, 2012), and her published work has also appeared in CUR Quarterly, College Composition and Communication, Pedagogy, Writing on the Edge, Composition Forum, and several edited collections. She serves on the editorial boards of Kairos, The Peer Review, the Journal of Veteran Studies, and the International Journal for ePortfolio, among others. As Director of Writing, she is responsible for training and supervising the peer writing consultants in Allegheny’s Learning Commons and for leading faculty development related to the teaching of writing across the curriculum.

    Michelle Grue’s interdisciplinary research in education and writing draws on Black feminism to investigate diversity issues in academia. Her forthcoming article in the Journal of Multimodal Rhetoric explores rhetorical performances in the dress practices of Black women professors. Her current project focuses on the official and unofficial ways graduate students learn how to research race and gender in writing and rhetoric doctoral programs. She earned her MA at the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Santa Barbara and is at the time of publishing a doctoral candidate in the same program.

    Eric Hall is Professor of exercise science at Elon University. His disciplinary research interests include the importance of physical activity on mental health and exploring the short and longer-term impacts of concussions on student-athletes. Additionally, he is interested in the influence of high-impact practices on student development, as well as, the importance of high-quality mentorship in undergraduate research and other high impact practices. He has co-authored eighty research articles and six book chapters, and he is co-editor of a book on concussions in athletics. At Elon University, he has received multiple awards for his mentorship of undergraduate students and his scholarship.

    Kristine Johnson is Associate Professor of English at Calvin College, where she directs the written rhetoric program and teaches courses in composition pedagogy, linguistics, and first-year writing. Her work has appeared in College Composition and Communication, WPA: Writing Program Administration, Pedagogy, Composition Studies, and various edited collections. At Xavier University, she co-founded the Xavier Journal of Undergraduate Research, and at Calvin College, she regularly collaborates with undergraduate researchers through the McGregor Undergraduate Research Program for summer research in the arts and humanities.

    Joyce Kinkead is Distinguished Professor of English at Utah State University. In 2012, she was named a Fellow of the Council on Undergraduate Research, an award that recognizes her national reputation for promoting undergraduate research, the first and only humanist to be so honored. The US Professors of the Year Program designated her the Carnegie Professor for the State of Utah in 2013. She is the 2018 D. Wynne Thorne Career Researcher, the highest honor awarded to a faculty researcher at USU. As Associate Vice President for Research overseeing undergraduate research, she instituted a number of programs: University Undergraduate Research Fellows; the Utah Conference on Undergraduate Research; and Research on Capitol Hill. She has authored or edited a number of books that focus on undergraduate research, including the following: Researching Writing: An Introduction to Research Methods (2016); Undergraduate Research Offices & Programs (2012); Advancing Undergraduate Research: Marketing, Communications, and Fund-raising (2011); Undergraduate Research in English Studies with Laurie Grobman (2010); Valuing and Supporting Undergraduate Research (2003). 

    Alexandria Lockett is Assistant Professor of English at Spelman College. She publishes about the technological politics of race, surveillance, and access. Her work has appeared in Composition Studies, Enculturation, and Praxis as well as Black Perspectives on Writing Program Administration: From the Margins to the Center (SWR Press), Out in the Center (Utah State University Press), and Bad Ideas about Writing (West Virginia University Digital Publishing Institute). An extended biography, which contains more information about her grants, service, works-in-progress, and consulting experience is available via her portfolio at: www.alexandrialockett.com, ORCID link: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6267-8875.

    Elizabeth Kleinfeld is Professor of English and Writing Center Director at Metropolitan State University of Denver. She teaches courses on rhetoric and composition theory and practice, including authorship studies and digital rhetoric. She researches student source use, academic integrity, and ways of teaching and assessing writing that promote inclusivity and social justice. Her pedagogy and research are informed by disability studies, feminism, and social justice theory. She has co-authored a textbook on multimodal and multi-genre composition and has published articles on writing center work, digital rhetoric, and student source citation practices.

    Shurli Makmillen is Assistant Professor at Claflin University in South Carolina. Her research draws from rhetorical theories of language and genre to understand a variety of literary and non-literary texts. This includes work on the ways Indigenous methodologies and knowledges are finding form in academic and legal genres. Publications along these lines have appeared in Linguistics in the Human Sciences and College Composition and Communication. 

    In a former life, Mike Mattison sold vacuum cleaners, fixed sump pumps, and worked on Park Avenue. For the past twenty years, though, he has been involved with writing centers, where he has been fortunate to collaborate with undergraduate advisors on a variety of research projects. He is the Director of the Writing Center, Associate Provost of Academic Support Services, and Associate Professor of English at Wittenberg University, where he teaches courses in writing center theory, composition theory, and rhetoric/grammar. He co-chaired the 2019 IWCA-NCPTW conference, and is the 2020 president of NCPTW. Two of his recent articles, in WLN: A Writing Center Journal and Praxis, were co-written with undergraduates.

    Laurie McMillan is Assistant Dean in the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Millersville University. Her research focuses on feminist writing and rhetoric as well as composition studies. She published a composition textbook, Focus on Writing (Broadview Press, 2019), and is working on a book manuscript titled Slut Rhetoric: Social Media, Pop Culture, and Politics. She has published articles in journals such as Peitho, Feminist Media Studies, and Radical Pedagogy as well as in a number of edited collections. She is teaching less frequently now, but she has a record of supporting undergraduate research in writing studies, with mentorship occurring both inside and outside the classroom.

    Jessie L. Moore is Director of the Center for Engaged Learning and Professor of English: Professional Writing and Rhetoric at Elon University. Jessie coordinates the Center’s research seminars, which support international, multi-institutional inquiry on engaged learning topics. She is the co-editor of Critical Transitions: Writing and the Question of Transfer (with Chris Anson, The WAC Clearinghouse and University Press of Colorado, 2016), Understanding Writing Transfer: Implications for Transformative Student Learning in Higher Education (with Randy Bass, Stylus, 2017), and Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research (with Maureen Vandermaas-Peeler and Paul Miller, CUR, 2018).

    Kim Fahle Peck is the Writing Center Director at York College of Pennsylvania, where she leads the writing tutoring and writing fellows programs and teaches courses on writing and writing center pedagogy. She currently serves as the Membership and Communication Chair of the Global Society of Online Literacy Educators (GSOLE) and the Web Coordinator for the Mid-Atlantic Writing Center Association (MAWCA), and she will serve as a co-editor of Young Scholars in Writing starting in 2020. 

    Patricia Roberts-Miller, Professor of Rhetoric and Writing and Director of the University of Texas at Austin University Writing Center, is the author of Rhetoric and Demagoguery (SIUP 2019), Demagoguery and Democracy (The Experiment 2017), Fanatical Schemes: Proslavery Rhetoric and the Tragedy of Consensus (U of Alabama P 2009), Deliberate Conflict: Argument, Political Theory, and Composition Classes (SIUP 2007), and Voices in the Wilderness: The Paradox of the Puritan Public Sphere (U of Alabama P 1999).

    Megan Schoettler is a PhD candidate in Composition and Rhetoric and a Graduate Assistant Director of Composition at Miami University. Her research centers on feminist pedagogy and rhetorics as well as writers’ learning dispositions. At York College of Pennsylvania, Megan was an undergraduate researcher and co-facilitator of the first annual Naylor Workshop for Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies. At Miami, Megan teaches composition theory and research to college and secondary-level writing teachers and has been recognized by the English department with an Outstanding Teacher Award. Megan also serves as an Editorial Assistant for the journal Women & Language.

    Jenny Olin Shanahan, PhD, is Assistant Provost for High-Impact Practices at Bridgewater State University—Massachusetts, where she supports Undergraduate Research, the Honors Program, National Fellowships, and a Research Internship program for students from underserved groups. Dr. Shanahan has co-edited five books and authored thirteen articles on undergraduate research. Her research focuses on inclusion and equity in high-impact practices for all students, excellence in mentoring undergraduate research and creative scholarship, and scaffolding research and inquiry across curricula.

    Field Watts is a graduate student in chemistry at the University of Michigan, conducting discipline-based education research in collaboration with the Sweetland Center for Writing. His work is focused on the implementation and assessment of writing-to-learn pedagogies in large-enrollment STEM courses. A National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, he works as a graduate student instructor within the chemistry department and as a graduate student instructional consultant within the Center for Research on Learning

     

  • Symposium Program

    Symposium Program

    Naylor Symposium
    September 26–29, 2018
    York, Pennsylvania

    “The most important obligation now confronting the nation’s colleges and universities is to break out of the tired old teaching versus research debate and define, in more creative ways, what it means to be a scholar . . . .  What is needed now is a new model of undergraduate education at research universities that makes the baccalaureate experience an inseparable part of an integrated whole.”                                          

    From the Boyer Commission Report, 1998 

    Special thanks to the generous benefactor,

    Irvin Naylor, 

    who established an endowment that has made this important work possible.

     

     Naylor Symposium Impact Notes

    About this Symposium: 

    The Naylor Symposium is a watershed event that calls together colleagues from all quarters of writing studies involved in steering undergraduate research in Writing Studies. In this three-day symposium on undergraduate research in our field, time will be divided between plenary discussions and working groups.

    The Naylor Symposium celebrates the fifth anniversary of the Naylor Workshop for Undergraduate Research in Writing Studies as well as the twentieth anniversary of the Boyer Commission report, Reinventing Undergraduate Education. This event calls together colleagues from all quarters of writing studies to discuss past and present praxes related to eight overarching undergraduate research motifs: mentorship, contribution to knowledge, research methods, dissemination, institutional support, curricula and co-curricula, impact, and access. Over three days, time will be divided between plenary exchanges and concurrent working groups designed to generate shared priorities and goals for the next five to twenty years of undergraduate research in writing.

     

    Symposium Working Groups

    Access

    Becky Babcock, University of Texas, TX Permian, Basin  
    Alex Lockett, Spelman College  
    Alexis Hart, Allegheny College
    Elizabeth Kleinfeld, Metropolitan State University, Denver   
    Lee Torda, Bridgewater State University 

    Contrbution to Knowledge

    Laurie Grobman, Pennsylvania State University, Berks
    Wendy Hayden, Hunter College
    Jane Greer, University of Missouri, Kansas City
    Heather Falconer, Curry College

    Curriculum

    Angela Glotfelter, Miami University of Ohio
    Bill FitzGerald Rutgers University, Camden
    Ethna Lay, Hofstra University
    Michael Rifenburg, University of North Georgia
    Mike Zerbe, York College of Pennsylvania
    Khirsten Eichols, University of Pittsburgh

    Dissemination/Circulation

    Doug Downs, Montana State University
    Megan Schoettler, Miami University of Ohio
    Trish Roberts-Miller, University of Texas, Austin            
    Justin Hodgson, Indiana University
    Laurie McMillan, Pace University

    Impact

    Heather Adams, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
    Jenn Fishman, Marquette University
    Ljiljana Coklin, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Enrique Paz, Miami University of Ohio  

    Institutional Support

    Mike Mattison, Wittenberg University
    Dominic DelliCarpini, York College of Pennsylvania
    Gabriel Cutrufello, York College of Pennsylvania 
    Andrea Efthymiou, Hofstra University          
    Michelle Grue, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Mentoring

    Sophia Abbot, Elon University
    Jessie Moore, Elon University
    Hannah Bellwoar, Juanita College
    Field Watts, University of Michigan 

    Methods

    Kim Fahle, York College of Pennsylvania 
    Jennifer Wells, New College of Florida
    Emily Cope, York College of Pennsylvania  
    Kristine Johnson, Calvin College
    Shurli Makmillen, Claflin University

    Cross-Group Support (the “Uber-Scholars") 

    Cynthia Crimmins, York College of Pennsylvania 
    Jenny Shanahan, Conference on Undergraduate Research & Bridgewater State U niversity

     

    Schedule of Activities

    Wednesday, 9/26

    WGI  

    7pm

    Reception and Introductions (buffet dinner served)

    Thursday, 9/27

    WGI  

    7-8:30am

    Breakfast at Wyndham Garden Inn

    CCE

    9am

    Plenary 1: Frames for UR in Writing

    CCE

    10:30am

    Break

    CCE

    10:45 -12pm

    Working Group Session 1: Inventing Possibilities 

    TBD

    12-1:30pm

    Lunch

    CCE

    1:30-3pm

    Working Group Session 2: Composing Possibilities

    CCE

    3pm

    Break

    CCE

    3:15-5:30pm

    Town Hall

    TBD

    TBD

    Dinner

    Friday, 9/28

    WGI

    7-8:30am

    Breakfast at Wyndham Garden Inn

    CCE

    9-9:30am

    Announcements and UR Exemplars (2-3)

    CCE

    9:30-11:45

    Working Group Session 3: From Possibilities to Recommendations

    CCE

    11:45

    Break

    TBD

    12:00-1:30

    Lunch and UR Exemplars (3-4) Lead Scholars lunch 

    CCE

    1:30-4:30

    Working Group Session 4: Revising Recommendations

    CCE

    4:30

    Break

    CCE

    4:45-6pm

    UR Exemplars (1-2) and Happy Hour Unconference

    TBD

    TBD

    Dinner

    Saturday, 9/29

    WGI

    7-8:30am

    Breakfast at Wyndham Garden Inn

    CCE

    9-9:45

    Working Group Session 5: Refining Recommendations

    CCE

    9:45

    Break

    CCE

    10-11:45

    Plenary 3: Delivering Recommendations 

    CCE

    12-1:30

    Lunch and Final Town Hall



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