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Title IX

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (to the Higher Education Act of 1965) prohibits gender-based discrimination in educational programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels.  It applies to an educational institution’s programs or activities including but not limited to: employment, academic, housing, educational, extracurricular, and athletic activities – both on- and off-campus.

The Title IX Office at York College handles inquiries regarding discrimination, harassment, or retaliation based on sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, and other forms of sexual misconduct.  Sexual misconduct could include, but is not limited to: sexual assault, relationship or dating violence, or sexual harassment.

  • Notice of non-discrimination

    Notice of non-discrimination

    York College is an equal opportunity employer and institution of higher education. We support legislation that protects College personnel and students against unlawful discrimination of any kind, including sexual harassment, and affirm the commitment of York College to ensure a fair, humane, and respectful environment for all employees and students.

    Sexual harassment is a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and is illegal, sex-based discrimination under Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972.  It is against the policy of York College of Pennsylvania for any person (faculty, administrator, staff member, or student) to engage in any form of sex-based discrimination or sexual harassment of another person (faculty, administrator, staff member, or student).

    Pursuant to Title IX, York College does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs or activities.  The College affirms that harassment or retaliation based on membership or perceived membership in any protected class is unlawful and is a violation of College policies.  In addition, the College does not tolerate harassment or retaliation against any person who reports discrimination, sexual harassment, or related concerns, or against anyone for participating in good faith in a Title IX report, investigation, conduct hearing, or any other form of claim resolution.

  • FAQ | Faculty and Staff

    Frequently Asked Questions for Faculty and Staff

    What types of incidents or situations does Title IX apply to?

    Title IX applies to any type of sex-based discrimination, including but not limited to: sexual harassment, rape or sexual assault, relationship or dating violence, gender-based stalking, and other forms of sexual misconduct. 

    What information do I need to make a report to the Title IX office?

    When reporting, please give us your name and position here at the college. We then ask that you share whatever information you’ve received about the incident(s). Please don’t try to investigate the situation yourself or to play detective to find out more details. 

    What if I’m not certain that the alleged incident(s) actually took place?

    You do not need to be certain or to do any investigating to determine whether a claim is valid in order to report it. Just report what you know so far and we’ll take it from there. 

    Do I have to report it to the Title IX office if a student discloses they’ve experienced a Title IX issue?

    Yes. Under York College policy, faculty members and most staff members are required to report these disclosures. When in doubt, please contact the Title IX Office for additional guidance. 

    Do I have to report a Title IX incident or situation that occurs in the course of a student’s co-op, internship, or externship experience?

    Yes. If they are a YCP student, you must report it. 

    What happens if I fail to report a Title IX issue that I become aware of?

    Colleges are required to comply with Title IX reporting requirements. Failure to do so can trigger severe sanctions for colleges including lawsuits, revocation of federal funding, etc... In addition, “deliberate indifference” to Title IX reporting requirements can trigger personal liability as well as institutional liability in these situations. 

    Do we have to report abuse that happened many years ago?

    Title IX doesn't require college employees to report abuse of a student that happened before they got to college. However, if the student is under age 18, and the abuse happened within the past two years, then it may fall under the PA State Mandated Reporting requirements for child abuse. (The Title IX Office can help determine whether that law applies, and if so, we’ll help determine next steps in reporting to the appropriate authorities.) Even if past abuse doesn’t fall under Mandated Reporting for child abuse or Title IX, we'd still want to provide information about available resources to any student who discloses past abuse, in case they need support around that issue now. Please contact the Title IX Office for additional guidance and resources in these situations. 

    What if a student discloses a Title IX issue in a class assignment or during a class presentation? Do I still have to report it to the Title IX Office?

    It depends. Although Title IX is not intended to deter or inhibit students’ freedom of self- expression, there are a number of variables that impact the answer to this question. The existence of an ongoing threat to student or employee safety is one variable that might require reporting. In addition, if the alleged victim is under 18, that could trigger PA State Mandated Reporting (of child abuse) requirements. If the victim is 18 or older, in most cases faculty and staff do not have to report a disclosure that happens in a reasonable context of coursework or research projects. Nonetheless, if this ever happens in one of your classes or in any educational or YCP activity, please contact the Title IX office so that we can help evaluate that specific situation and provide guidance on how best to respond to and support that student. If you’re not sure whether a particular student’s disclosure is technically covered under the “coursework” exception, please contact the Title IX Office for additional guidance. Note: Act 126 indicates that PA State Mandated Reporting requirements for child abuse do apply to disclosures of abuse via class assignments when the alleged victim is under age 18. The Title IX office can provide more guidance on this as needed. 

    What about disclosures that happen at “Take Back the Night” events or “Speakouts”?

    If a student discloses a sexual assault or other sexual misconduct during a speech or activity at one of these events, such disclosures are generally not viewed as reportable under Title IX. If/when such an event is planned, we’ll proactively provide resources for attendees about available support services on and off campus related to these issues. 

    What if someone doesn’t want to report a Title IX concern for fear of retaliation?

    Multiple civil rights laws, including Title VII and Title IX, protect against retaliation. If a student or employee makes a report about harassment or sexual misconduct of any kind, it is unlawful for the school, its representatives, or any student to retaliate against that person. It’s also unlawful to retaliate against anyone who provides information as a witness or respondent to an incident, or against anyone who participates in good faith in the school’s investigation and/or a conduct hearing process. Retaliation includes but is not limited to: intimidating, threatening, or coercing a victim, a witness, or a respondent, impeding an investigation, or in any way discriminating against an individual because they made a complaint or because they are participating in an investigation or in the adjudication of that complaint. Any incidents of retaliation should be reported to the Title IX Office immediately. 

    What about free speech?

    Although Title IX protects students from any kind of sex-based discrimination, it does not regulate the content of speech. Having said that, please keep in mind that certain offensive actions or speech that are unwelcomed, severe, and/or repetitive could create a hostile environment or quid pro quo harassment - which IS prohibited by Title IX and Title VII. Likewise, the First Amendment does not protect speech that is intimidating or threatening to others, or otherwise creates a hostile environment or unsafe conditions. 

    Does Title IX dictate what materials I can use in my classes?

    No. Title IX does not require, prohibit, or abridge the use of particular textbooks or curricular materials. 

    Source: Parts of this information were adapted from the US Department of Education’s Office on Civil Rights guidelines. 

    Is Title IX-related education and training available for my department?

    Absolutely. Trainings can be scheduled at dates and times that are most convenient for the employees in your department, and can cover a variety of topics, including but not limited to... 

    • Employees’ responsibilities under Title IX 

    • What happens here on campus once a Title IX issue is reported 

    • The role of the Title IX Coordinator 

    • Effective strategies for responding to disclosures or related questions from students in the moment 

    • How you can help/support a student who’s dealing with these issues 

    • What to do if you hear a rumor about a student dealing with a Title IX issue 

    • What to do if you’re being propositioned, harassed, or stalked by a student 

    • Other related issues 

    YCP Sexual Misconduct Policy

     

     

  • FAQ | Students

    Frequently Asked Questions for Students

    What is Title IX?

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (to the Higher Education Act of 1965) prohibits sex-based discrimination in educational programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels.  It applies to an educational institution’s programs or activities including but not limited to: employment, academic, educational, residential, extracurricular, and athletic activities.  The overarching goals of Title IX are to work toward ending, preventing, and remedying sex-based discrimination and sexual misconduct within educational institutions.

    Title IX covers many forms of sexual misconduct, including but not limited to: 

    • sexual assault
    • sex-based stalking
    • rape
    • dating or relationship violence
    • sexual harassment
    • sexual exploitation
    • other forms of sexual misconduct or sex-based discrimination

    What happens if I report sexual misconduct, harassment, or other form of sex-based discrimination?

    When a student reports a Title IX issue, the Title IX Coordinator will talk with the individual to get a sense of what happened and to assess whether it’s a Title IX issue.  We’ll then discuss the student’s rights and options in these situations and provide an overview of the next steps in the Title IX process.  Students will be given the option to file a formal complaint if they choose to.  Meanwhile, if there are any ongoing safety concerns, the Title IX Office will also consult with Campus Safety and/or Residence Life to help ensure student safety during the investigation and adjudication process. 

    More details about how the College addresses complaints of sexual misconduct can be found in the YCP Student Code of Conduct, Sexual Misconduct Policy

    What kind of support is available to me if I experience a Title IX issue? 

    The Title IX Coordinator and other departments on campus can provide support, information, and options as well as contact info. for a variety of other on- and off-campus resources.  We can answer questions and provide resources for help with: academics, residence life, safety issues, contacting local law enforcement, medical care, mental health, and other concerns.

    What kind of support is available to me if I am accused of a Title IX violation?

    Under Title IX, the same supports are available to students who are accused of sexual misconduct.  As listed above, these include resources and information related to: academics, residence life, safety issues, questions about local law enforcement, medical care, mental health, and other concerns.

    What if I were under the influence at the time of the incident?

    Student survivors and/or witnesses who report in good faith an incident of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sexual harassment, or other sexual misconduct may be protected under the YCP Amnesty Policy as described in our Sexual Misconduct Policy, if they were in violation of the YCP Drug & Alcohol policies at the time.  Please refer to that policy for additional details. 

    What if someone retaliates against me because of something I reported, or because of something that I’ve been accused of doing?

    Retaliation against anyone involved in a Title IX case is a violation of College policy and is taken very seriously by the College.  Retaliation includes but is not limited to:  Intimidation, threats, coercion, discrimination, or other adverse action(s).  If you feel you are being retaliated against because of your involvement in a sexual misconduct case, please report your concerns to the Title IX Coordinator immediately.

    Where can I go if I’ve been raped, sexually assaulted, or have experienced another form of sexual misconduct while a student at YCP, but I’m not ready yet to make a formal report to the Title IX Office?

    Confidential sources of support (can keep most Title IX reports confidential)

    Other sources of support (have requirements to report Title IX incidents to the Title IX Office)

    • Title IX Coordinator (HUM 24): 717.815.1440
    • Campus Safety: 717.815.1403 (24/7)
    • Your RA - if you’re a residential student
    • Another trusted leader on campus

    What if I have more questions?

    The Title IX Coordinator can answer additional questions and provide guidance regarding any form of sexual misconduct.  The Coordinator can also discuss the Title IX processes and student rights with you as needed.  You will not be forced to talk about the details of what happened until you are ready.  

  • Training for Title IX Personnel

    Training for Title IX Personnel

    Coming soon.

  • Reporting Sexual Misconduct

    Reporting Sexual Misconduct at York College

    The Title IX Office at York College handles inquiries regarding discrimination, harassment, or retaliation based on sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, or other forms of sexual misconduct.  Sexual misconduct could include but is not limited to rape, sexual assault, relationship or dating violence, sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, or sex-based stalking.

    Any person may report sexual harassment or other sexual misconduct at any time.  To report a Title IX concern or to ask a question please contact:

    Holly Moreels | Title IX Coordinator

    441 Country Club Rd.

    York, PA  17403-3651

    titleix@ycp.edu

    717.815.1440


    Anonymous reports:


    Anonymous reports may be submitted through the YCP Spartan Watch Tip Line or by calling Campus Safety at 717.815.1314 (ext. 1314 from campus phones).  

    In addition, Campus Community members who have downloaded the LiveSafe App may make an anonymous report to Campus Safety by selecting “Report Tips”, then selecting “assault/ abuse”.  Make sure to select the send anonymously option at the bottom of the screen.

    Retaliation is prohibited:

    The College prohibits retaliation against any individual for making a report, filing a formal complaint, testifying, assisting, participating, or refusing to participate in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing regarding allegations of sexual misconduct.

Contact Us
Title IX
Holly Morreels, MS, Title IX Coordinator
Humanities Center, 24
Phone: 717.815.1440
titleix@ycp.edu

Inquiries or complaints may also be directed to: Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 100 Penn Square East, Suite 515, Philadelphia, PA  19107-3323

(215) 656-8541   www.OCR.Philadelphia@ed.gov

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